Clark earns National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship

Posted: May 7, 2020

Rob Clark
Clark
Ohio State mechanical engineering PhD student Rob Clark has been selected to receive a 2020 National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship Award.

Clark’s research was advised by Professor Jeffery Bons and centered on deposition of particulates in high temperature environments, notably gas turbine engines.

For his proposal to NDSEG, Clark focused on the thermodynamic design, modeling and optimization of thermal management systems for future military aircraft.

“To be honest, it's a little overwhelming to be recognized,” Clark said. “I felt that I had written a strong proposal, but there are a lot of intelligent and qualified folks out there and the competition is quite stiff. I'm humbled that the experts at the Department of Defense felt that my proposal was worthy of selection for the NDSEG Fellowship.”

The fellowship is awarded in recognition of his academic excellence in science, technology, engineering and math achievements. Clark was selected out of more than 4,176 applications received this year, according to NDSEG. NDSEG fellowships need to promote education in science and engineering disciplines relevant to the mission of the U.S. Department of Defense.

The fellowship lasts for three years and pays for full tuition and all mandatory fees, includes a monthly stipend, a travel budget over the fellow’s tenure for professional development and up to $1,200 a year in health insurance.

Clark is originally from Indiana and attended Purdue University for his undergraduate degree. From Purdue, he joined GE Aviation where he helped design aircraft engines. He received his master’s degree from Ohio State through GE Aviation's Edison Engineering Development Program, and is now pursuing his PhD.

“I'm excited to engage in research that utilizes my industry background to push the envelope in military aircraft design,” Clark said. “I hope that this fellowship will help springboard me to a successful academic career.”

by Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering